cv

01 Jun 2017

78. 10 STEPS TO A PERFECT CV

Some research suggests that employers can spend as little as 7 seconds to read a CV before moving on to the next one. Therefore it is vital that the document, which acts as a key to the door of an interview, is of the highest possible quality and gives you the best chance of getting to the next stage of the recruitment process. Here are 10 steps to creating the perfect CV:

TAILOR IT TO THE ROLE

If you are applying for more than one type of role you may need a different CV for each, highlighting the skills and abilities that match the needs and wants of each employer.

CHECK GRAMMAR AND SPELLING

Some employers reject candidates outright if their CVs contain more than one or two typos. Get someone else to check it through.

KEEP IT SHORT

A CV should be no more than two sides. The recruiter or selection committee may have to look through many applications and a long one is unlikely to be read.

REVERSE CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER

Put your timeline of experience in reverse order with the most recent first.

CONSIDER A SHORT PROFILE AT THE BEGINNING

This is a brief profile summarising the key attributes you have for the particular role. If time is short, this might be the key to getting the rest of the CV read.

TAKE A MARKETING APPROACH

Think about the target audience. What is the role? What might this club or organisation need or want from the ideal candidate? If there is no job advert, do some detective work and research. Highlight the skills and abilities you have that make you suitable for this specific role.

LEAVE OUT UNNECESSARY DETAILS

Nobody needs to know the name of your wife and children, for example. Only include what’s relevant.

SUBSTANCE OVER STYLE

Glossy CVs, colour pictures, bound brochures; all of these are available in the market, but while they may make you stand out, don’t forget that it’s the words that count. Make sure that what you are highlighting is the key message you wish to communicate in a concise and professional CV. Plain A4 typed is fine.

BE SPECIFIC AND GIVE EXAMPLES

Give an example of when and where you have led, identified or coached and developed a player with examples and names where possible, particularly if they are well known.

ACHIEVEMENT ORIENTED

Highlight your successes at whatever level, including what you have achieved by leading, reorganising a system or introducing something new.